How to setup SOCKS proxy in Linux

SOCKS server is a general purpose proxy server that establishes a TCP connection to another server on behalf of a client, then routes all the traffic back and forth between the client and the server. It works for any kind of network protocol on any port. SOCKS Version 5 adds additional support for security and UDP.

Use of SOCKS is as a circumvention tool, allowing traffic to bypass Internet filtering to access content otherwise blocked, e.g., by governments, workplaces, schools, and country-specific web services

Using SSH

SOCKS proxies can be created without any special SOCKS proxy software if you have Open SSH installed on your server and an SSH client with dynamic tunnelling support installed on your client computer.

Now, enter your password and make sure to leave the Terminal window open. You have now created a SOCKS proxy at localhost:1080. Only close this window if you wish to disable your local SOCKS proxy.

Using Microsocks program

MicroSocks is a multithreaded, small, efficient SOCKS5 server.

It’s very lightweight, and very light on resources too:

for every client, a thread with a stack size of 8KB is spawned. the main process basically doesn’t consume any resources at all.

the only limits are the amount of file descriptors and the RAM.

It’s also designed to be robust: it handles resource exhaustion gracefully by simply denying new connections, instead of calling abort() as most other programs do these days.

another plus is ease-of-use: no config file necessary, everything can be done from the command line and doesn’t even need any parameters for quick setup.

Installing microsocks

git clone git@github.com:rofl0r/microsocks.git

cd microsocks

make

Starting socks service

all arguments are optional. by default listenip is 0.0.0.0 and port 1080.

option -1 activates auth_once mode: once a specific ip address authed successfully with user/pass, it is added to a whitelist and may use the proxy without auth. this is handy for programs like firefox that don’t support user/pass auth. for it to work you’d basically make one connection with another program that supports it, and then you can use firefox too.

How to protect files from overwriting with noclobber in bash

This tip is for people who have ever hosed important files by using > when they meant to use >>. Add the following line to .bashrc:

set -o noclobber

The noclobber option prevents you from overwriting existing files with the > operator.

If the redirection operator is ‘>’, and the noclobber option to the set builtin has been enabled, the redirection will fail if the file whose name results from the expansion of word exists and is a regular file. If the redirection operator is ‘>|’, or the redirection operator is ‘>’ and the noclobber option is not enabled, the redirection is attempted even if the file named by word exists.

Example:

 

Run:

noclobber