How to configure IPsec/L2TP VPN Clients on Linux

After setting up your own VPN server, follow these steps to configure your devices. In case you are unable to connect, first, check to make sure the VPN credentials were entered correctly.

Commands must be run as root on your VPN client.

To set up the VPN client, first install the following packages:

Create VPN variables (replace with actual values):

Configure strongSwan:

Configure xl2tpd:

The VPN client setup is now complete. Follow the steps below to connect.

Note: You must repeat all steps below every time you try to connect to the VPN.

Create xl2tpd control file:

Restart services:

Start the IPsec connection:

Start the L2TP connection:

Run ifconfig and check the output. You should now see a new interface ppp0.

Check your existing default route:

Find this line in the output: default via X.X.X.X .... Write down this gateway IP for use in the two commands below.

Exclude your VPN server’s IP from the new default route (replace with actual value):

If your VPN client is a remote server, you must also exclude your Local PC’s public IP from the new default route, to prevent your SSH session from being disconnected (replace with actual value):

Add a new default route to start routing traffic via the VPN server:

The VPN connection is now complete. Verify that your traffic is being routed properly:

The above command should return Your VPN Server IP.

To stop routing traffic via the VPN server:

To disconnect:

How to specify the source address for all outbound connections

If you have multiple IPs assigned on your Linux pc then there is a chance that you want to use different IPs for some applications than default one. Updating IP routes every time isn’t a good idea and you may mess up.

get bindhack.c

wget 'https://gist.githubusercontent.com/akhilin/f6660a2f93f64545ff8fcc0d6b23e42a/raw/7bf3f066b74a4b9e3d3768a8affee26da6a3ada6/bindhack.c' -P /tmp/

compile it

gcc -fPIC -static -shared -o /tmp/bindhack.so /tmp/bindhack.c -lc -ldl

Copy it to library folder

cp /tmp/bindhack.so /usr/lib/ && chmod +x /usr/lib/bindhack.so

Optional (ignore if you have it already )

echo 'nameserver 8.8.8.8' >> /etc/resolv.conf

using bindhack

BIND_ADDR=<source ip> LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/bindhack.so <command here>

Example

 

you can add below function in your .bashrc to spin it at any time

 

 

take a look at bindhack.c

 

 

Network namespaces – part 2

How to run OpenVPN tunnel inside a network namespace

Linux network namespaces can be used to control which processes should be tunneled by OpenVPN.

First create an –up and –down script for OpenVPN. This script will create the VPN tunnel interface inside a network namespace called vpn, instead of the default namespace.

Then start OpenVPN and tell it to use our –up script instead of executing ifconfig and route.

Now you can start programs to be tunneled like this:

Or start a separate shell

 

Network namespaces – part 1

Linux namespaces are a relatively new kernel feature which is essential for implementation of containers. A namespace wraps a global system resource into an abstraction which will be bound only to processes within the namespace, providing resource isolation. In this article I discuss network namespace and show a practical example.

What is namespace?

A namespace is a way of scoping a particular set of identifiers. Using a namespace, you can use the same identifier multiple times in different namespaces. You can also restrict an identifier set visible to particular processes.

For example, Linux provides namespaces for networking and processes, among other things. If a process is running within a process namespace, it can only see and communicate with other processes in the same namespace. So, if a shell in a particular process namespace ran ps waux, it would only show the other processes in the same namespace.

Linux network namespaces

In a network namespace, the scoped ‘identifiers’ are network devices; so a given network device, such as eth0, exists in a particular namespace. Linux starts up with a default network namespace, so if your operating system does not do anything special, that is where all the network devices will be located. But it is also possible to create further non-default namespaces, and create new devices in those namespaces, or to move an existing device from one namespace to another.

Each network namespace also has its own routing table, and in fact this is the main reason for namespaces to exist. A routing table is keyed by destination IP address, so network namespaces are what you need if you want the same destination IP address to mean different things at different times – which is something that OpenStack Networking requires for its feature of providing overlapping IP addresses in different virtual networks.

Each network namespace also has its own set of iptables (for both IPv4 and IPv6). So, you can apply different security to flows with the same IP addressing in different namespaces, as well as different routing.

Any given Linux process runs in a particular network namespace. By default this is inherited from its parent process, but a process with the right capabilities can switch itself into a different namespace; in practice this is mostly done using the ip netns exec NETNS COMMAND… invocation, which starts COMMAND running in the namespace named NETNS. Suppose such a process sends out a message to IP address A.B.C.D, the effect of the namespace is that A.B.C.D will be looked up in that namespace’s routing table, and that will determine the network device that the message is transmitted through.

Lets play with ip namespaces

By convention a named network namespace is an object at /var/run/netns/NAME that can be opened. The file descriptor resulting from opening /var/run/netns/NAME refers to the specified network namespace.

create a namespace

power up loopback device

open up a namespace shell

now we can use this shell like user shell where it uses ns1 namespace only

 

In part-2  , I will explain how to connect to internet from ns1 namespace and adding custom routes.